Cricket Umpiring

Umpiring Videos

The Laws of Cricket with Stephen Fry To better understand the laws of cricket, Marylebone Cricket Club (Lord’s) has launched a new set of animated videos that will help young crickets, players, novices and casual fans. These videos are narrated by Stephen Fry (actor, writer, cricket lover and sometime umpire), and are quite short and sweet. In about two mins you will understand many jargons like ‘the wicket is down‘ and ‘batsman is out of his ground‘. You can also learn rules regarding damaging of pitch and hitting the ball twice.

Law 36: LBW

The striker is out LBW in the circumstances set out below. (a) The bowler delivers a ball, not being a No ball, and (b) the ball, if it is not intercepted full pitch, pitches in line between wicket and wicket or on the off side of the striker’s wicket, and (c) the ball not having previously touched his bat, the striker intercepts the ball, either full pitch or after pitching, with any part of his person, and (d) the point of impact, even if above the level of the bails, either (i) is between wicket and wicket,
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Law 28: The Wicket is Down

(a) The wicket is put down if a bail is completely removed from the top of the stumps, or a stump is struck out of the ground, (i) by the ball, or (ii) by the striker’s bat if he is holding it or by any part of his bat that he is holding, or (iii) notwithstanding the provisions of Law 6.8(a), by the striker’s bat in falling if he has let go of it, or by any part of his bat becoming detached, or (iv) by the striker’s person or by any part of his clothing or equipment becoming detached from his person, or (v) by a fielder with his hand or arm, providing that the ball is held in the hand or hands so used, or in the hand of the arm so used.
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Law 25: Wide Ball

1. Judging a Wide (a) If the bowler bowls a ball, not being a No ball, the umpire shall adjudge it a Wide if, according to the definition in (b) below, in his opinion the ball passes wide of the striker where he is and which also would have passed wide of him standing in a normal guard position. (b) The ball will be considered as passing wide of the striker unless it is sufficiently within his reach for him to be able to hit it with his bat by means of a normal cricket stroke.
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Law 39: Stumped

(a) The striker is out Stumped, except as in 3 below, if, (i) a ball which is not a No ball is delivered, and (ii) he is out of his ground, other than as in 3(a) below, and (iii) he has not attempted a run, when (iv) his wicket is fairly put down by the wicket-keeper without the intervention of another fielder. Note, however Laws 2.8(c) and (e) (Transgression of the Laws by a batsman who has a runner) and 40.3 (Position of wicket- keeper).
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Law 42: Damaging the Pitch

(a) It is incumbent on all players to avoid unnecessary damage to the pitch. A player will be deemed to be causing avoidable damage if either umpire considers that his presence on the pitch is without reasonable cause. It is unfair to cause deliberate damage to the pitch. (b) An area of the pitch, to be referred to as ‘the protected area’, is defined as that area contained within a rectangle bounded at each end by imaginary lines parallel to the popping creases and 5 ft/1.52 m front of each, and on …
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Laws 26: Bye and Leg Bye

1. Byes If the ball, delivered by the bowler, not being a No ball or a Wide, passes the striker without touching his bat or person, any runs completed by the batsmen from that delivery, or a boundary allowance, shall be credited as Byes to the batting side. 2. Leg byes (a) If a ball delivered by the bowler first strikes the person of the striker, runs shall be scored only if the umpire is satisfied that the striker …
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Law 24: No Ball

1. Mode of delivery (a) The umpire shall ascertain whether the bowler intends to bowl right handed or left handed, over or round the wicket, and shall so inform the striker. It is unfair if the bowler fails to notify the umpire of a change in his mode of delivery. In this case the umpire shall call and signal No ball. (b) Underarm bowling shall not be permitted except by special agreement before the match.
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Law 32.3: Fair Catch

Providing that in every case     neither  (i)    at any time the ball     nor  (ii)    throughout the act of making the catch as defined in Law 19.4, any fielder in contact with the ball is, as described in Law 19.3(b), touching the boundary or grounded beyond the boundary, a catch shall be considered to be fair if (a)    the ball is hugged to the body of the catcher or accidentally lodges in his clothing or, in the case of a wicket-keeper only, in his pads.  However, it is not a fair catch if the ball lodges in a protective helmet worn by a fielder.
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Laws 2 and 29: Runners

1.Substitutes and Runners (a) If the umpires are satisfied that a nominated player has been injured or become ill since the nomination of the players, they shall allow that player to have, (i) a substitute acting for him in the field. (ii) a runner when batting. Any injury or illness that occurs at any time after the nomination of the players until the conclusion of the match shall be allowable, …
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Cricket Umpiring

Umpiring Videos

The Laws of Cricket with Stephen Fry To better understand the laws of cricket, Marylebone Cricket Club (Lord’s) has launched a new set of animated videos that will help young crickets, players, novices and casual fans. These videos are narrated by Stephen Fry (actor, writer, cricket lover and sometime umpire), and are quite short and sweet. In about two mins you will understand many jargons like ‘the wicket is down‘ and ‘batsman is out of his ground‘. You can also learn rules regarding damaging of pitch and hitting the ball twice.

Law 36: LBW

The striker is out LBW in the circumstances set out below. (a) The bowler delivers a ball, not being a No ball, and (b) the ball, if it is not intercepted full pitch, pitches in line between wicket and wicket or on the off side of the striker’s wicket, and (c) the ball not having previously touched his bat, the striker intercepts the ball, either full pitch or after pitching, with any part of his person, and (d) the point of impact, even if above the level of the bails, either (i) is between wicket and wicket,
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Law 28: The Wicket is Down

(a) The wicket is put down if a bail is completely removed from the top of the stumps, or a stump is struck out of the ground, (i) by the ball, or (ii) by the striker’s bat if he is holding it or by any part of his bat that he is holding, or (iii) notwithstanding the provisions of Law 6.8(a), by the striker’s bat in falling if he has let go of it, or by any part of his bat becoming detached, or (iv) by the striker’s person or by any part of his clothing or equipment becoming detached from his person, or (v) by a fielder with his hand or arm, providing that the ball is held in the hand or hands so used, or in the hand of the arm so used.
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Law 25: Wide Ball

1. Judging a Wide (a) If the bowler bowls a ball, not being a No ball, the umpire shall adjudge it a Wide if, according to the definition in (b) below, in his opinion the ball passes wide of the striker where he is and which also would have passed wide of him standing in a normal guard position. (b) The ball will be considered as passing wide of the striker unless it is sufficiently within his reach for him to be able to hit it with his bat by means of a normal cricket stroke.
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Law 39: Stumped

(a) The striker is out Stumped, except as in 3 below, if, (i) a ball which is not a No ball is delivered, and (ii) he is out of his ground, other than as in 3(a) below, and (iii) he has not attempted a run, when (iv) his wicket is fairly put down by the wicket- keeper without the intervention of another fielder. Note, however Laws 2.8(c) and (e) (Transgression of the Laws by a batsman who has a runner) and 40.3 (Position of wicket-keeper).
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Law 42: Damaging the Pitch

(a) It is incumbent on all players to avoid unnecessary damage to the pitch. A player will be deemed to be causing avoidable damage if either umpire considers that his presence on the pitch is without reasonable cause. It is unfair to cause deliberate damage to the pitch. (b) An area of the pitch, to be referred to as ‘the protected area’, is defined as that area contained within a rectangle bounded at each end by imaginary lines parallel to the popping creases and 5 ft/1.52 m front of each, and on …
More Info More Info

Laws 26: Bye and Leg Bye

1. Byes If the ball, delivered by the bowler, not being a No ball or a Wide, passes the striker without touching his bat or person, any runs completed by the batsmen from that delivery, or a boundary allowance, shall be credited as Byes to the batting side. 2. Leg byes (a) If a ball delivered by the bowler first strikes the person of the striker, runs shall be scored only if the umpire is satisfied that the striker …
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