Cricket Umpiring

The Laws of Cricket

The laws of cricket are a set of rules established by the Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC) which describe the laws of cricket worldwide, to ensure uniformity and fairness. There are currently 42 laws, which outline all aspects of how the game is played from how a team wins a game, how a batsman is dismissed, through to specifications on how the pitch is to be prepared and maintained. The MCC retains the copyright in the laws of the game and only the MCC may change the laws, although nowadays this would usually only be done after discussions with the game's global governing body the International Cricket Council (ICC). Cricket is one of the few sports for which the governing principles are referred to as 'Laws' rather than as 'Rules' or 'Regulations'. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The MCC (Marleybone Cricket Club) as the sole authority

The game of Cricket has been governed by a series of Codes of Laws for over 250 years. These Codes have been subject to additions and alterations recommended by the governing authorities of the time. Since its formation in 1787, the Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC) has been recognisedas the sole authority for drawing up the Code and for all subsequent amendments.  The Club also holds the World copyright. The basic Laws of Cricket have stood remarkably well the test of well over 250 years of playing the game.  It is thought the real reason for this is that cricketers have traditionally been prepared to play in the Spirit of the Game as well as in accordance with the Laws. In 2000, MCC revised and re-wrote the Laws for the new Millennium.  In this Code, the major innovation was the introduction of the Spirit of Cricket as a Preamble to the Laws. Whereas in the past it was assumed that the implicit Spirit of the Game was understood and accepted by all those involved, MCC felt it right to put into words some clear guidelines, which help to maintain the unique character and enjoyment of the game. In 2013, some further revisions were made. These are highlighted in yellow in the following document: 2013 Laws of Cricket Ammendment
Cricket Umpiring

The Laws of Cricket

The laws of cricket are a set of rules established by the Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC) which describe the laws of cricket worldwide, to ensure uniformity and fairness. There are currently 42 laws, which outline all aspects of how the game is played from how a team wins a game, how a batsman is dismissed, through to specifications on how the pitch is to be prepared and maintained. The MCC retains the copyright in the laws of the game and only the MCC may change the laws, although nowadays this would usually only be done after discussions with the game's global governing body the International Cricket Council (ICC). Cricket is one of the few sports for which the governing principles are referred to as 'Laws' rather than as 'Rules' or 'Regulations'. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The MCC

(Marleybone

Cricket Club) as

the sole authority

The game of Cricket has been governed by a series of Codes of Laws for over 250 years. These Codes have been subject to additions and alterations recommended by the governing authorities of the time. Since its formation in 1787, the Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC) has been recognisedas the sole authority for drawing up the Code and for all subsequent amendments.  The Club also holds the World copyright. The basic Laws of Cricket have stood remarkably well the test of well over 250 years of playing the game.  It is thought the real reason for this is that cricketers have traditionally been prepared to play in the Spirit of the Game as well as in accordance with the Laws. In 2000, MCC revised and re-wrote the Laws for the new Millennium.  In this Code, the major innovation was the introduction of the Spirit of Cricket as a Preamble to the Laws. Whereas in the past it was assumed that the implicit Spirit of the Game was understood and accepted by all those involved, MCC felt it right to put into words some clear guidelines, which help to maintain the unique character and enjoyment of the game. In 2013, some further revisions were made. These are highlighted in yellow in the following document: 2013 Laws of Cricket Ammendment